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Category archives: Audio

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A few days ago we added audio processing statistics to Auphonic productions, which display details about what our algorithms are changing in your audio file.
Some classifier results and processing steps are also shown directly in the player audio waveform and all statistics can be exported via the Auphonic API or the new output file ...

Do you know what's great about text? It's really easy to find stuff! You just do a quick search on that website you bookmarked last week, and boom! – there is the name of that book that you had read about, but whose title you had forgotten. But on the downside, text is ...

Finally we found some time to collect a few listening examples for our audio algorithms – thanks to all the people who provided audio files!
Everything is processed automatically and you can try Auphonic yourself with the unprocessed files and will get the same results.

The official Auphonic Audio Example page is here: Audio Examples ...

Have you ever wondered how loud your audio productions should be? So have we, because it's a quite tricky question to answer!

On the one hand, you want to make sure your productions are loud enough. For example, they should still appear at a reasonable level in noisy environments (car, airplane, etc.), and their ...

We are very happy that Opus, an exciting new open audio codec, is now officially standardized by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). Opus is particularly interesting for podcasts, radio books and internet audio in general due to its suitability for both, music and speech, and its outstanding sound quality at also very low bitrates ...

Have you ever wondered why commercials sound louder than your favorite TV shows? Or why you have to adjust the playback volume on your television when switching between channels? The answer is that until recently, there was no standard way to measure the perceived loudness of sound recordings. Instead, audio productions were (and still are ...

The last metadata format in this comparison series will be metadata for AAC audio files, which are usually included in an MP4 container (see MPEG-4 Part 14). MP4 audio files can have various file extensions, most commonly m4a, but also mp4 or m4b (for audio books).
So let the confusion continue ...

MP4, AAC and iTunes-style ...

A new week - a new format: this weeks post is about metadata in Ogg Vorbis audio. The metadata container for these files is called Vorbis comment, which is also used in the FLAC, Theora and Speex file formats.
For a general introduction into audio metadata see e.g. the previous post in this comparison series ...

The second post of this comparison series is about metadata in MP3 files. Metadata allows information such as the title, artist, comments, cover image and other information about the audio to be stored in the file itself. MP3 files use ID3 tags and in the following I will compare common tags, image details and ID3 ...

This is the first entry out of a series of posts, where I compare various aspects of popular podcasts. Part 1 is about file formats, bitrates, samplerates, channels, size, length and filenames.

The selection is based on Flattr podcast charts (mostly german), iTunes Store Top 10 Podcasts (english, german), podcasts by public radios (english, german ...